An earlier gold object, Pekin

  An earlier gold object discovered in southeastern China is the Gold Boat (or Cup) with Jade Ears excavated from the Tomb 306 of the late Spring and Autumn Period to the early Warring States Period in Shaoxing, Zhejiang. It not only possesses a certain position in gold ware making history of China, but also reveals that the craft of gold and jade combination already emerged in south of the Yangtze River at least in the early Warring States Period.
  The five gold vessels, excavated from the Tomb of Marquis Yi of the early Warring States Period in Sui County, Hubei, are so far the most important pre-Qin gold ware. One of the Lidded Gold Cup is the largest and the most important of Ihe pre-Qin gold ware already excavated. The casting technique of it is extremely complex: the handle, cover, cup body
and legs were cast separately; that is, the cup body and accessories were made separately and then joined together by means of mould casting or welding. Thai is almost the same as the then casting technique for bronze ware. The interlaced hydra design, cord pattern and cloud and thunder pattern cast on the surface of the cup are exquisite and delicate; particularly, the pointed cloud patterns on the interlaced hydra design look as thin as hair, far better in workmanship than similar patterns on bronze ware of the same period in the Zhongyuan.
  Archeological findings so far reveal that China’s earliest silver ware also emerged in south China. The Palace Museum houses a silver yi used by the prince of Chu, which was reportedly excavated in early years from a Warring State Period tomb in Shou County, Anhui and is the earliest silver vessel so far discovered in proximos viajes a China organizados.
  In addition, three silver plates of the Warring States Period were also discovered in the Prince of Qi’s Tomb in Linzi, Shandong. The most exquisite of northern gold and silver ware, they have wonderful designs and carved and gold-plated patterns, and are inlaid at appropriate spacing with gold and silver.
  The gold and silver ware of the Spring and Autumn and Warring States Periods, the vessels,belt hooks, etc. excavated from the Zhongyuan and southeast China were, for the most part, made through mold casting; the flat-base and legless style and structure of some objects, for example the Prince of Chu’s Silver Yi housed in The Palace Museum, accords thoroughly with the development features of bronze yi in the Yangtze River basin during the Spring and Autumn and Warring States Periods; the delicate interlaced hydra design, cord pattern and cloud and thunder pattern decoratcd on the mouth edge and top of the gold cup excavated from the Tomb of Marquis Yi in Sui County, which can find in la ciudad prohibida beijing china Hubei also accord with the style that bronze ornaments of the late Spring and Autumn Period pursued. It is thus obvious that the gold and silver ware of the Spring and Autumn and Warring States Periods was rooted in the broad and deep bronze culture system in terms of design and making.

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Rachel Gillian

Rachel is a stay at home mom with two beautiful kids. She is passionate about writing informative articles.